Revit crop locked

The first are scope boxes and how they relate to your datum elements in your model. The second one is a plan region and how it helps with plan view visibility.

Datum elements such as levels and grids associate themselves to scope boxes. This gives the user control over visibility and consistent placement of these elements. When you have a datum element such as a level or grid selected you can assign a scope box to those elements in the properties box as shown in Figure 2 below. Once your Datum elements are associated to a scope box you can adjust the size of the scope box and the datum element follows along.

The datum elements must cross the scope box, if the scope box is adjusted and does not cross the datum element you will get an error like the one shown in Figure 3 below. Scope Boxes are created in a plan view and can be associated to any related views in the project. With a scope box selected you can name it appropriately and access the visibility control of other views to display the scope box and associated datum elements.

revit crop locked

Figure 5 shows the Scope Box Views Visible dialog box that allows the user to make the scope box visible in other associated views in the project. This is useful not only to display the datum elements, but also to keep them consistent from the associated scope box. When working in the 3D modeling environment, you may need to display some framing that is located outside your view range for a particular plan.

Instead of making another floor framing plan to show this you can use a plan region to have a custom view range for just one area in your plan. Figure 7 shows an area that has some beams connected to the columns shown.

However, the beams are not being displayed because they are above the view range. If the view range is adjusted for the entire view to accommodate showing these beams, you may lose other structural members in the view.

So in a case such as this where you need to display this framing to avoid creating an entire new floor framing plan, a plan region is ideal. Once you activate the plan region tool, your model is grayed out and you are in a sketch mode to outline the area for which you want to adjust the view range.

revit crop locked

Select your plan region after you complete the sketch. In the properties box you can adjust the view range. This adjustment will only affect the visibility of the area defined by the plan region and will leave the rest of your framing plan the same.

Figure 10 shows the result—displaying the beams that were not visible with the standard view range assign the floor framing plan. This technique is ideal for showing mezzanine areas. The scope box and plan region tools should be part of your everyday workflow when developing your construction documents. Scope Box Datum elements such as levels and grids associate themselves to scope boxes. Figure 1: Scope box tool When you have a datum element such as a level or grid selected you can assign a scope box to those elements in the properties box as shown in Figure 2 below.

Figure 2: Assigning a scope box to a datum element Once your Datum elements are associated to a scope box you can adjust the size of the scope box and the datum element follows along. Figure 3: Scope box error Scope Boxes are created in a plan view and can be associated to any related views in the project. Figure 4: Scope box visibility access Figure 5 shows the Scope Box Views Visible dialog box that allows the user to make the scope box visible in other associated views in the project.

Figure 5: Visibility control of scope box Plan Region When working in the 3D modeling environment, you may need to display some framing that is located outside your view range for a particular plan. Figure 6: Plan region tool Figure 7 shows an area that has some beams connected to the columns shown. Figure 7: Columns shown but beams out of view range Once you activate the plan region tool, your model is grayed out and you are in a sketch mode to outline the area for which you want to adjust the view range.

Figure 8: Sketch view range Select your plan region after you complete the sketch. Figure 9: Plan region view range Figure 10 shows the result—displaying the beams that were not visible with the standard view range assign the floor framing plan.

Figure Plan region results Summary The scope box and plan region tools should be part of your everyday workflow when developing your construction documents. Marilyn Law marilyn.Many users completely ignore the scope box tool. It's understandable, as these green boxes look a little silly and can be annoying. That said, the moment you start working on larger projects with multiple wings, scope boxes are a must.

Controlling the crop region of multiple views becomes incredibly simple. Managing the extents of levels and grids is also much easier.

revit crop locked

The tips below contain everything you need to understand and master scope boxes. Make sure to watch the video if you prefer. However, once a scope box is created, it is going to be visible in the other view categories: sections, callouts, elevations and 3D views. In elevations and sections, the scope box is only going to be visible if it intersects the cut line. You can adjust the extents of the scope box in all view categories. Consider this office building renovation project.

The area affected is in the middle of the building. You want the views to be cropped to fit the red rectangle. The thing is: you have a lot of views to create. Existing floor plan. Demolished floor plan. New floor plan. An archaic workflow would be to manually adjust the crop region of each view. That would probably work. But what if the project changes and the area affected gets bigger?

You have to adjust all the crops again? Go to the View tab and create a Scope Box. Match it to your intervention area. Give it a name. Have a look at the Instance Properties of your plan view. Under Extents, you will find the Scope Box parameter.All the same Lynda. Plus, personalized course recommendations tailored just for you.

All the same access to your Lynda learning history and certifications. Same instructors. New platform. Join Paul F. Aubin for an in-depth discussion in this video View extents and crop regionspart of Revit Essential Training for Architecture Imperial.

Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched? This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course. Type in the entry box, then click Enter to save your note. Start My Free Month. You started this assessment previously and didn't complete it.

You can pick up where you left off, or start over. Develop in-demand skills with access to thousands of expert-led courses on business, tech and creative topics.

Video: View extents and crop regions. You are now leaving Lynda. To access Lynda. Visit our help center. Preview This Course. Resume Transcript Auto-Scroll. Author Paul F. This course is designed for students who have no prior Revit experience and want to work in imperial units inches and feet. First, get comfortable with the Revit environment, and learn to set up a project and add the grids, levels, and dimensions that will anchor your design.

Then, instructor Paul F. Aubin helps you dive into modeling: adding walls, doors, and windows; using joins and constraints; creating groups; linking to DWG files; and modeling floors, roofs, and ceilings. Paul also shows advanced techniques for modeling stairs and complex walls, adding rooms, and creating schedules. Finally, discover how to annotate your drawings so all the components are clearly understood, as well as output sheets to PDF and AutoCAD.

Topics include: Understanding BIM and the Revit element hierarchy Navigating views Creating a new project from a template Adding walls, doors, and windows Adding plumbing fixtures and other components Linking AutoCAD DWG files Rotating and aligning Revit links Working with footprint and extrusion roofs Adding openings Adding railings Creating stacked and curtain walls Hiding and isolating objects Adding rooms Creating schedule views and tags Adding text and dimensions Creating new families Using reference planes, parameters, and constraints Plotting and creating a PDF.

Skill Level Beginner. Show More Show Less. Related Courses. Preview course. Search This Course Clear Search. Revit for architecture 55s.Results 1 to 10 of Thread: Ability to Lock Views in Revit. Thread Tools Show Printable Version. Login to Give a bone. Does anyone know of a method to lock the settings in a view within Revit? I ask this because it seems like after spending much time getting a particular view that is placed on a drawing sheet to look exactly like it should, it takes only seconds for someone to mess it up by modifying things like view scale, display quality from course to medium to fine, limits of cropping area, etc.

Is there anything in Revit, or any technique that you might be using, to avoid this problem? Thanks in advance for your help. Nothing automatic unfortunately. You can use view templates to get things back to where you want them but the only cure for preventing people from messing with things is duplicating views and using them as working views.

Once a view is placed on a sheet it shouldn't be touched unless you need to change somethng for output. Pinning the view will lock it's proportions. I don't know if it will lock anything else. Haven't tried. One tool you can use is the "Freeze Drawing" extension available for free at: www. So it takes a model view and makes it a 2D line representation. So if you are refering to sections or details you know are complete and wont change, it is worth a shot.

Just keep in mind that when you make chnages to the model and expect these "frozen" drafting views to change, they wont. However, the model views will of course update. Sorry, just to clarify this tool works with Revit Structure.

revit crop locked

A view lock would be nice for 3d views. When I render I often post process in photo shop. Then the inevitable revision will come along and i need to render again. Most of the time I forget I'm in the presentation view and pan and rotate the view.Jason Harrell. Tom Mickow. View all 9 replies and continue this conversation. Powered by Get Satisfaction. Community powered support for Photoshop Family. New Post. Home Categories About.

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Sign In Register. Community Home Products: Lightroom Classic. Lightroom: Crop lock reverts when changing to next picture. Sometimes seems to be random after unlocking and locking the crop perspective in one picture and then moving on to the next image, the crop perspective is unlocked again when cropping the next image despite having relocked the perspective in the previous image. Is there anyway to keep the crop perspective lock the same when moving to another image?

Jason Harrell 2 Posts 0 Reply Likes annoyed. All 9 Replies Official. Tom Mickow Posts Reply Likes. Official Response. I think Rikk's suggestion will fix it for awhile, but you'll still probably be confused as to why it keeps happening without some more explanation, so this is what I've found in my Lr use over the years.

I believe it's correct, but if someone else has a more authoritative answer, hopefully they'll jump in The aspect lock state is saved per image, so when you go back to an image later, that state is preserved. That part makes perfect sense. Where it gets confusing is what happens when you're going through images that have never had a crop setting applied to them. In this case, Lr appears to default to whatever state the lock was in the last time a save was made, but only when a save was made to an image that previously had no crop changes applied.

For example, import a batch of new images, select one, go into Develop, open the Crop tool, turn off the lock, crop the image however you want and click Done. Now, any of the other new images you use the crop tool on will default to unlocked as well because the last lock state was unlocked. Again, seems logical enough.

Now here's the weird part. When you use the crop tool on any of the unedited images, the lock state will still be unlocked. As Rikk said, if you use the crop tool on any of the other unedited images and change the lock state to locked, that will reset the default, so now any of the remaining unedited images will default to the locked state. Head spinning yet?All the same Lynda. Plus, personalized course recommendations tailored just for you. All the same access to your Lynda learning history and certifications.

Resize Crop Regions Explicitly

Same instructors. New platform. Join Paul F. Aubin for an in-depth discussion in this video Understanding view extents and crop regionspart of Revit Architecture Essential Training Metric. Are you sure you want to mark all the videos in this course as unwatched? This will not affect your course history, your reports, or your certificates of completion for this course.

Type in the entry box, then click Enter to save your note. Start My Free Month. You started this assessment previously and didn't complete it. You can pick up where you left off, or start over. Develop in-demand skills with access to thousands of expert-led courses on business, tech and creative topics.

Video: Understanding view extents and crop regions. You are now leaving Lynda. To access Lynda. Visit our help center. Preview This Course. Course Overview Transcript View Offline Exercise Files - In this movie, I'm going to look at…a completely different aspect of controlling what you see…in your views in Revit and look at the Crop Region feature.

Resume Transcript Auto-Scroll. Author Paul F. This course, recorded entirely in metric units, teaches you the techniques you need to complete solid architectural projects in Revit First, get comfortable with the Revit environment, and learn to set up a project and add the grids, levels, and dimensions that will anchor your design.

Then author Paul F. Aubin helps you dive into modeling: adding walls, doors, and windows; creating and mirroring groups; linking to external assets and DWG files; and working with floors, roofs, and ceilings.

Paul also shows advanced techniques for modeling stairs, complex walls, and partially obscured building elements, as well as adding rooms and solid geometry.This means the size of the region in the view is the same size as the region on a sheet.

You can also specify the offset of the annotation crop region from the model crop region. The Crop Region Size dialog opens. Annotation crop options are not available for perspective 3D views. There are 2 modes for resizing the crop region: Field of View mode and Scale mode. You can explicitly set the height and width of a crop region in paper space.

3 ways to crop a 3D view in Revit

In the drawing area, select the crop region. If you are modifying a crop region in a perspective 3D view, select either Field of view or Scale locked proportions. Examples of these modes are provided at the end of this procedure. Modify the values for width and height.

Note: If you selected Scale for a perspective 3D view, you can modify only height or width, because the values are locked. In Field of View mode, you are stretching the crop region to the specified size.

Scope Boxes and Plan Regions

For example, if you change a crop region from mm wide by 75 mm high to 50 mm wide by 25 mm high, the crop region updates accordingly. Field of View mode is for perspective and non-perspective views. In Scale mode, you change either the height or the width, and Revit maintains the aspect ratio. When you change the value, the view scales, but the field of view remains the same. Scale mode is for perspective views only. Parent topic: Controlling the Elements Displayed in a View.

Related Concepts About the Crop Region.